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    Laying down new tracks

    Toronto, ON
    September 14, 1925

    By John Boyd

    The Mount Pleasant Road car line under construction in North Toronto in September 1925. The Toronto Transportation Commission inaugurated the new street car line two months later on November 3, 1925.

    All reprints come with a letter from the Publisher of The Globe and Mail.

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    Half-century beacon to down-trodden

    Toronto, ON
    June 10, 1945

    The Globe and Mail

    The Yonge Street Mission in Toronto. In the 50 years of helping to reclaim Toronto's down and outs, those who serve at the Yonge Street Mission have come to the conclusion that adversity can be a blessing for many men. The Mission, which is marking half a century work in the city, was founded back in the 1890s by a group of leading citizens. Today aid is being given to people from many different walks of life: to unwed mothers, to adolescent boys and girls, to derelicts and those trying not to become derelicts.

    All reprints come with a letter from the Publisher of The Globe and Mail.

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    Toronto celebrates peace in South Africa

    Toronto, ON
    June 1, 1902

    By Alexander Galbraith / The Galbraith Collection

    On June 2, 1902, The Globe announced on its front page that a peace treaty had been signed in South Africa ending the Boer War. A special cable dispatch reading 'Peace Has Been Declared' was received by The Globe on Sunday, June 1, 1902 at 10 minutes past 1 o'clock in the afternoon and was the first announcement of the termination of the war to reach Toronto, or, in all possibllity, any part of Canada. Later that day, crowds celebrated "Pretoria Day" on the streets of Toronto.

    All reprints come with a letter from the Publisher of The Globe and Mail.

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    Landmark may soon disappear

    Toronto, ON
    December 22, 1923

    By John Boyd

    The old Doel House, at Bay and Adelaide, site of the printing plant of William Lyon Mackenzie where plans were made which culminated in the Rebellion of Upper Canada in 1837. The former brewery and home, once owned by John Doel, is situated on the northwest corner of Bay Street and Adelaide Street.

    All reprints come with a letter from the Publisher of The Globe and Mail.

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